Breakfasting with Beer: Lemon Pancakes

LemonPancakesAerialThis blog wouldn’t be doing it’s duty of compiling a series of breakfast and beer combinations without some form of pancakes being on the menu. The inspiration for this little number came from a little B&B in upstate New York where some scrumptious lemon pancakes were served up one morning in a charming old homestead. I scoured the internet to try my best at recreating them and found a recipe, which I imagine to be very similar, at Jen’s Favourite Cookies, a baking blog, so kudos Jen! (Mine don’t look anywhere near as good!)

The beer I’ve chosen to go with these tasty breakfast morsels is a coffee porter from London outfit Meantime Brewing Company. It presents a sturdy coffee aroma that translates decently to the palate with some tartness to the bitter overtones. A relatively light-bodied porter, it’s deep, dark brown in colour with a tan head and smooth mouthfeel.

The Recipe

Lemon Pancakes with Butter and Maple Syrup | Makes about 10 pancakes

What you need:

  • 1 1/2 cups plain flour
  • 1 tablespoon castor sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • juice of half a lemon
  • butter and maple syrup to serve

What to do:

  1. Combine flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in a large bowl. Make a well in the centre.
  2. Add oil, egg, milk, lemon juice and zest and, using a whisk, mix well.
  3. Butter a warm frying pan and drop batter onto pan, making each pancake about 1/4 cup batter. Cook until edges are brown and bubbles appear over the majority of the surface. Flip and cook on the other side. Remove from frying pan and keep warm. Repeat with remainder of batter.
  4. Serve with generous lashings of butter and maple syrup. And beer!

LemonPancakes

The Match-Up

The dominant coffee flavours on the palate balance the sweet starchiness of the pancakes while the tart undertones of the beer’s bitterness tie in well with the lemon flavours despite them losing any sign of tart or sourness through cooking. The bitterness of the porter contrasts against the sweet syrup and yet its coffee smack goes hand in hand with the maple flavours. It’s almost like having your regular morning coffee, albeit alcoholic and served chilled.

Other Recommendations

* This article was originally posted as part of drunkenspeculation.com‘s Breakfast Beer Week.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s